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Paradigm Shift - Petition For Freedom "Let My People" Go During The...
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Publish-date-icon January 20, 2014
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To be posted here and on hebrewnationline.com on Friday Jan 31st, 2014 for your self examination and decision to participate with us on the satanic abomination bowl day of Feb 2, 2014.
These are the workings of our satanic worshiping banker kings of the houses of Windsor, for your entertainment of course.

These are the abominations done in our midst by the renewed, renamed, and occulted priests of Baal and Moloch, coming out of Egypt and still corrupting us today!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Imbolc or Imbolg (pronounced i-MOLK or i-MOLG ), also called Saint Brighid’s Day (Irish: Lá Fhéile Bríde, Scottish Gaelic: Là Fhèill Brìghde, Manx: Laa’l Breeshey), is a Gaelic festival marking the beginning of spring. Most commonly it is held on 31 January–1 February, or halfway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox.[1][2] It is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals, along with Beltane, Lughnasadh and Samhain.[3] It was observed in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Kindred festivals were held at the same time of year in other Celtic lands; for example the Welsh Gŵyl Fair y Canhwyllau.

Imbolc is mentioned in some of the earliest Irish literature and it is associated with important events in Irish mythology. It has been suggested that it was originally a pagan festival associated with the goddess Brighid and that it was Christianized as a festival of Saint Brighid, who herself is thought to be a Christianization of the goddess. At Imbolc, Brighid's crosses were made and a doll-like figure of Brighid, called a Brídeóg, would be carried from house-to-house. Brighid was said to visit one's home at Imbolc. To receive her blessings, people would make a bed for Brighid and leave her food and drink, while items of clothing would be left outside for her to bless. Brighid was also invoked to protect livestock. Holy wells were visited and it was also a time for divination.

In Christianity, 1 February is observed as the feast day of Saint Brighid, especially in Ireland. There, some of the old customs have survived and it is celebrated as a cultural event by some. Since the 20th century, Celtic neopagans and Wiccans have observed Imbolc, or something based on Imbolc, as a religious holiday.

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